Watch

Stunning 15.2hh TB mare in Acle

£1,950

I'm very tentatively putting the feelers out to see if anyone would be interested in my lovely TB mare. I'm in absolutely no rush to sell, but due to personal circumstances she's currently wasted in a field when she could be out and about and giving someone lots of fun.

This is going to be a completely honest advert as if I do decide to sell her, I would want to find her the best home.

She is a 15.2hh, chestnut Irish thoroughbred with fantastic bloodlines (including sadlers wells, secretariat and Northern Dancer) who started her career over in Ireland, but due to her being absolutely rubbish, her racing career ended after a few short years, her best placing being third.
She was brought over to England where she was sold to a young lady who retrained her and concentrated on jumping, which I'm told is what she's done for most of her life. Due to this, her schooling is somewhat lacking, and I can't imagine for one minute she'd win any dressage or showing classes without someone spending a bit of time getting her working correctly.
She was still BSJA registered when I bought her, but I don't jump at all and have no idea how the whole BSJA thing works, so I honestly couldn't tell you where she stands with that now.
I personally haven't jumped her, but have seen video's of her jumping and have spoken to previous owners who assure me she will jump anything, hardly ever refusing. But again, I personally haven't done anything jumping wise with her.

She is a lovely horse to have on the yard, and is an absolute yard favourite, she's very easy to do, and is very cheap to keep considering she's a TB. She's a very good doer (she's slightly pig ish) and doesn't drop a lot of weight in winter like most TBs tend to do.
She's not your typical TB in the respect that you don't need to ride her every day to keep her sane. She can be left for days, weeks or even months and jump back in her knowing that she'll still be quiet and sensible. Of course like all horses she can have her moments, but it's never anything dangerous, she may just get a bit 'looky' if there's something she's unsure of.
Hacks alone or in company. Again, like most horses she's much better in company, but she will happily hack alone. Nothing phases her, she's seen all sorts of traffic and is 100%. To get to our hacking now we actually have to cross a busy bypass which she doesn't bat an eye at.
Currently living out, but she is stabled overnight in winter, and she currently lives in a herd environment, but she has been in individual turnout with a previous owner. She does like the company of other horses and she's always been kept with them with me, so I couldn't say what she'd be like on her own.
Brilliant to catch, usually comes to greet you at the gate when you arrive at the yard.
Absolute start to tack up, stands like a donkey lol. She's a snaffle mouth for everything.
Up to date with teeth/jabs/worming etc.

Now for her not so good bits:
She can be rather stubborn to load. She's not at all scared and has travelled in both a box and a trailer, but sometimes she has moments when she wants to do things in her own time. Being forceful with her doesn't help, she just digs her feet in more. I find that when she's being stubborn, a bucket of feed usually helps. She normally gets bored and loads, the longest it's taken me is 20 minutes. With some work I think this could be easily sorted, I just don't own a box/trailer so am unable to work on this with her. Once loaded she travels like a dream, has travelled the length of England on more than one occasion.
With her previous owner, she did have a very bad experience with a farrier and this is not something she's forgotten, so she can be a pain in the bum with a new farriers and having her feet done. She's got much better since I've owned her, and I can now lift all four feet (she can be grumpy with her back ones) and she's currently shod on fronts only. She's better for the farrier if she has a haynet or a lick and the farrier is calm and quiet.
She likes to be left alone in her stable, and is very protective of her feed. So I generally tend to leave her alone once she's in her stable, that's her space, I respect that.
She's not a cuddly, affectionate horse. She won't tolerate being kissed and cuddled lol, and would rather be out in the field with her mates than being fussed over, but she does stand happily to be groomed and primped, it's just not her favourite thing to do.
While she's not your typical TB, she is definitely not a novice horse. Whilst she is quiet to ride, and never silly, she is still an ex racehorse so needs someone who is capable of keeping her head in the game, especially when she's jumping.
She has just turned 16 this February, but please don't be put off by this, she acts and looks like a five year old and has plenty of life left in her yet. She would make a brilliant riding club horse for a more experienced teenager, or a lovely mother/daughter share, again for a more experienced teenager.
She does have some lumps and bumps on her legs from a previous field accident but nothing that affects her and I'm happy to go into details for any potential buyers.
She is microchipped and fully passported.

If she was a hand bigger, I wouldn't even be thinking about selling her, but unfortunately she's just a touch too small for me, hence I'm thinking of selling her to a more suitable home.
She's been out of work for the majority of the last year (I've only ridden her three times since last November) and we have no school so I would be selling her straight from the field.
Hundreds of photos and videos on request.

Home is way more important than price, I want to find the best home for my girl, so I am more than happy to discuss price for any suitable homes, but I won't just give her away to ensure she gets a good home.

Please email in the first instance if you think you might be interested.
Thanks in advance.

Ad ID:
37287916
Posted:
1 week ago
LB
Acle
Joined
Sep 2021
Response rate
100%

Guide to rehoming

Rehoming a new pet is a lifetime commitment. Make sure you make the right choice with advice from the Pets Advertising Advisory Group.
Read More Pets